Search

The Squires Family

The Squires crop up in relation to two properties in Bingham, Ebenezer House on the Banks and 17 Long Acre. The family can be traced to George Squires, a letter carrier in Cropwell Bishop in 1871. The key parts of the family tree are as follows:

The detailed relevant census entries are:

1841 *
Cropwell Bishop
George Squires  
20
bricklayer
Sarah wife
16
 
   
 
John Squires  
30
bricklayer
Sarah wife
30
bonnet maker
Henry son
7
 
Emma daughter
4
 
Mary Horton servant
24
 
* 1841 census rounded ages of adults down to nearest 0 or 5
   
 
1851
Cropwell Bishop
 
 
George Squires  
34
builder
Sarah wife
28
 
John son
9
scholar
James son
7
scholar
George son
2
 
   
 
John Squires  
43
bricklayer with two journeymen and app
Sarah 43  
 
Henry son
17
bricklayer’s apprentice
Unreadable daughter
14
scholar
Sarah Ann daughter
5
 
Samuel son
2
 
Rebecca (unreadable) niece
22
bonnet maker
   
 
1861
Cropwell Bishop
 
 
George Squires  
44
builder
Sarah wife
38
 
James son
17
builder
George son
12
 
Steven son
10
 
Sarah Grace daughter
8
 
Gershon son
3
 
Jane Ann daughter
1
 
   
 
The Village, Cropwell Bishop  
 
John Squires  
52
builder (born Flintham)
Sarah wife
53
(born Cropwell Bishop)
Henry son
27
builder
Sarah Ann daughter
15
 
Samuel son
12
scholar
Willam Crampton  
18
apprentice
Charlotte Morley  
16
visitor
   
 
1871  
 
Mill Hill Cottages, Cropwell Bishop  
 
George Squires  
54
letter carrier
Sarah wife
48
 
George son
22
bricklayer
Stephen son
20
letter carrier
Gersham son
13
 
Jane daughter
11
 
Elizabeth daughter
9
 
Caroline daughter
6
 
Adeliza daughter
4
 
   
 
1881  
 
Squires Houses, Cropwell Bishop  
 
John Squires  
73
Bricklayer/local Methodist preacher (born Flintham)
Sarah wife
74
 
Ellen Sponge niece
28
housekeeper
   
 
Mill Hill, Cropwell Bishop  
 
Sarah widow
58
Freeholder
Caroline daughter
17
 
   
 
Mill Hill, Cropwell Bishop  
 
Stephen Squires  
30
Gravestone engraver
Susan wife
32
(born Bingham)
Margaret daughter
4
 
William son
2
 
Oliver son
8 months
 
   
 
Cooperative Store, Cropwell Bishop  
 
George Squires  
32
Baker and Grocer
Miriam wife
32
 
William son
9
 
James son
7
 
Albert son
5
 
George son
4
 
   
 
1891  
 
High End Farm, Cropwell Bishop  
 
George Squires  
42
Bricklayer
Miriam wife
42
 
Albert son
15
Bricklayer’s assistant
Leah daughter
9
 
John son
7
 
Henry son
3
 
   
 
High End Farm, Cropwell Bishop  
 
John Squires  
43
Agricultural Labourer
Emma wife
42
 
Ann daughter
3
 
Lois daughter
1
 
Long Acre, Bingham  
 
Stephen Squires  
40
Monumental Mason
Susannah wife
42
 
Margaret daughter
14
(born Cropwell Bishop)
Oliver son
10
(born Cropwell Bishop)
Steven son
6
check where born
George son
4
 
Kate daughter
2
 
   
 
1901  
 
Mill Hill, Cropwell Bishop  
 
George Squires  
52
Builder
Miriam wife
52
 
John son
17
bricklayer’s apprentice
Henry son
13
 
   
 
Mill Hill, Cropwell Bishop  
 
Albert Squires  
25
Bricklayer
Clara wife
25
 
Lewis son
1
 
   
 
1901  
 
Long Acre, Bingham
 
 
Stephen Squires
 
50
Monumental Mason
Susannah
wife
52
 
Margaret
daughter
24
 
Oliver
son
20
Monumental Mason
Stephen
son
16
Pupil Teacher
George
son
14
 
Kate daughter
12
 

Family History

The examination of census and other records adds texture to the bare ownership transfers recorded in deeds. Here we have an example of a trade, building, being passed from fathers to sons over at least three generations with brothers and cousins taking up the trade. Stephen initially followed his father’s second occupation of letter carrying and then somehow became a monumental mason, with his son Oliver following him onto that trade. Albert was clearly following family tradition!

There are many headstones carved by Stephen in Cropwell Bishop, where he first carried out his trade, and other local church yards, including one partly carved by him and partly by George. Perhaps one of the Georges carved occasionally. Sometimes only the mason’s name appears at the foot of a stone; sometimes the village in which they worked is carved too. Many Squires’ headstones occur of course in Bingham churchyard and in the town cemetery. The earliest we have seen so far to mention Bingham is 1883; the deeds of 15 Long Acre suggest this was probably the date he moved to Long Acre from Cropwell Bishop. The extensive range of outbuildings was probably built specifically for Stephen’s trade – the deeds to number15 have a plan show the land was already leased to Squires in 1885. A watchword of Stephen’s was ‘catch them with a tear in the eye and you’ll get the business’ – he made a habit of attending funerals in pursuit of his trade!

Examples of the Squires’ work can be seen in a number of local churchyards and in Bingham cemetery. The old church at Colston Bassett has a large group, Granby, Scarrington, Hawksworth …and even Epperston (across the Trent).. also have a few examples.

Directories for Bingham after 1901 show Oliver to have followed in his father’s trade, which he operated from 17 Long Acre until the mid 1950s. The 1911 electoral rolls show him as a boarder with his father, and later he seems to have gone to live with Albert and Clara at Ebenezer House (1921). Then he married Annie and lived elsewhere on the Banks. Kate stayed at home, a lifelong spinster, and taught music from 17 Long Acre until the 1960s. Her brothers and sister were also accomplished musicians and often played together. There is a record of the family performing a concert in aid of the chapel at Cropwell Bishop in the early 1900s.

Son Stephen was a pupil teacher in 1901 and went on to be headmaster of a school in West Bridgford. George was killed in action in the First World War. Margaret married John Walker, the saddler, and went to live at 6 Porchester Villas.

There is a strong chance George (b 1817) and John (b1808) were brothers. George’s eldest son was called John, which might have been after his brother or possibly his father (after whom his elder brother could well have been called). Interestingly John and his Sarah had only four children.

Size of families in the nineteenth century is often of interest. George and Sarah had 10 children, all of whom seem to have survived (the census loses track of John between 1851 and 1861, by which year he would have been 19, so may have left home or he might have died in his teens). Sarah bore children from age 21 to 44. She may have had even more, as there are two gaps of five years between children where mostly the gap between the other children is only two years.

The second George had seven children with Miriam; she bore children between the ages of 21 and 39. If there were more they did not survive a census interval of ten years and would therefore not be recorded.

Family Christian names are repeated and skip between branches of the family. Commonest are John, George and Henry.


Home Page | About Us | Links | Contact Us | Newsletter

Site developed by Ambrow Limited | Published by the Bingham Heritage Trails Association | All content is © BHTA
for site credits click here

Back to
top of page