Search

1841 maps – Archive (1)

The Town Map

Although only 65 years later than the Chesterfield Estate survey of 1776, the substantial growth of Bingham during those years is clearly illustrated by comparing the two maps (see part 3). Farmers’ holdings became more concentrated, trade and manufacturing increased markedly (as adduced by examination of the census and the directories) and cramped ‘slum’ housing was developing, largely in the west end of the town.

Each town holding is described below in a similar geographic sequence to the 1586 and 1776 archives, but inserting new developments (e.g. Needham Street) as appropriate. Numbers are the tithe map apportionment number. The full, digitised town map is at map 2 larger scale maps are given for each area of the town.

The maps appear as a pdf. You will need Adobe reader to view them. The size of the map can be adjusted using tools available in your pdf viewer - the image can be magnified and the hand tool used to scroll around the enlarged map.

Click here for a pdf version of the legend for types of building; you can make this a small window and keep it open to use whenever you view a map in the sequence below.

Nottingham Road
The tithe map does not name this piece of road, the Long Acre name does not cross the junction with Fair Close (also not named on the map). The census for 1841 uses Long Acre as the address for people living in what we now know as Nottingham Road. “Nottingham Road” does not appear until the 1851 census, although it is used in the 1835 directory.
644 The Workhouse. The Bingham Union workhouse for 200 inmates was erected in 1836-37, with the old workhouse in Moor Lane being kept in use until its completion. The two-acre site on the south side of the Nottingham Road "at the top end of town" was bought from Lord Chesterfield at £150 per acre. The architect of the new building was Henry J Stevens although his design was based on the model "200-pauper" plan published by the Poor Law Commissioners in 1836. The Rector, Robert Lowe, had been a prime contributor to the Poor Law Amendment Act which set up the Unions. The final cost of the building was £3,160. The bricks were supplied by John Doncaster (see later).
330.1 Inn. Described in the apportionment as Public house, buildings, yard & garden in the freehold occupation of Jonathon Crooke. In the 1832 directory he is listed (as Crook) as licensee of the William IV on Long Acre but in the 1835 directory he is a retailer of beer on Nottingham Road.
82 A block of 12 tenements owned by John Wright and occupied by George Allen and others. Allen was a joiner listed in the census as living in Wright’s Buildings, Long Acre with his wife and 3 Children. One house was unoccupied at the time of the map and the census. Figure 1 lists the heads of households. 55 people lived in the 11 occupied houses, including 5 Agricultural Labourers, 2 wheelwrights, a bricklayer, cowherd, gardener, lace runner, sawyer, seamer, shoe maker and washerwoman. This is a microcosm of the poorer inhabitants and a good indication of the range of occupations that had developed since 1776. The houses were about 21½ feet by 15½, i.e. with about 650 square feet of living space on two floors. The largest family were the Worthingtons with 6 children under 12.

Figure 1

Surname
Christian Name
Age
Occupation
Allen
George
35
Joiner
Worthington
John
30
Sawyer
Willoughby
William
26
Ag. Lab.
Pritchett
George
29
Shoe m.
Lowe
Francis
35
Ag. Lab.
Wickham
Joseph
56
Gardener
Braithwait
William
47
Ag. Lab.
Radford Robert
26
Ag. Lab.
Bird
Winifred
50
Ind.
Wilson
Richard
55
Wheelwright
Wilson Robert
42
Cowherd

83 House owned and occupied by John Mabbott. He is not in the census but his widow Ann is listed as being in Long Acre, so she was presumably here. She was a rich lady and owned several properties in Bingham and loaned money on others.
84 House owned by James Wiggington and occupied by William Saunders a shoemaker, almost certainly working for an employer. Wiggington also owned No. 158. Although the apportionment indicates only one house, the map suggests there could have been 3. The census lists William (a shoe maker) as living in Spring Gardens, along with three other families – 22 people.
85 2 houses owned by Peter MacLaughlin with one occupied by Elizabeth Bowman who in the census was in Newgate Street. (MacLaughlin also owned no 89)
84 and 85 seem to make up what in the census was termed Spring Gardens. If the order in the census list is correct, the Willoughbys (Ag Lab) and Sheppersons (shoe maker) would have been in 85 and The Wilsons (stocking maker) the other family in 84.
79 14 tenements (one unoccupied) owned by George Skinner Snr. and occupied by Anne Harrad (not in census) and others. These were listed in the census as Skinner’s Buildings. We have managed to locate probably 11 households living in Skinners Buildings, adding up to 63 people, including 10 Framework Knitters and 2 stocking makers, an indication of the extent of development of that industry. 5 members of the Padgett household and 4 of the Baxters were framework knitters. The father in each case was listed as a stocking maker. The houses must have been too small for that many looms, so they may have been employed in small workshops elsewhere – there was one such workshop by the old farmhouse in Market Street. There were also 6 agricultural labourers and a sawyer.
Two households are in the census between Widnals (89) and Brewster (76) (figure 2). They are not shown as Skinner’s Buildings but as there are no houses in between these two they could be at Skinners. These are Frances Horsepool and John Plowright. Marston (78) is shown out of sequence in the census between other Skinners Buildings’ people; another family in the same position and not marked as Skinner’s, but probably were, is Goodwin).

Figure 2

Address
Surname
Christian Name
Age
Occupation
Long Acre
Horsepoole Francis
35
Ag. Lab.
Long Acre
Plowright John
30
Bricklayer
Skinner's Bdgs; Long A.
Brewster Joseph
25
Ag. Lab.
Long Acre
Goodwin William
25
Ag. Lab.
Skinner's Bdgs; Long A.
Padget Francis
45
Stocking m.
Skinner's Bdgs; Long A.
Baxter Thomas
49
Stocking m.
Skinner's Bdgs; Long A.
Wilson William
20
Ag. Lab.
Skinner's Bdgs; Long A.
Radford William
48
Ag. Lab.
Skinner's Bdgs; Long A.
Smith Joseph
35
Ag. Lab.
Skinner's Bdgs; Long A.
Brewster Thomas
36
Ag. Lab.
Skinner's Bdgs; Long A. Holt Richard
45
Stocking m.

78 House owned and occupied by John Marston, an agricultural labourer.
77 House owned and occupied by Samuel Brewster, an agricultural labourer. Samuel also owned four tenements at 287 on Long Acre.
76 House owned and occupied by William Brewster, an agricultural labourer.
It might be thought unusual for an agricultural labourer in 1841 to be able to own their house, but this is what the apportionment records.
89 2 tenements owned by Peter MacLaughlin and occupied by William Richards, an agricultural labourer, and John Widnall - in the census Widnal - a shoemaker. (See also 85)
90 House, Blacksmith's Shop & Garden owned and occupied by Joseph Widnall. He is not in the census under any spelling and it looks as though he had moved on. The census shows two blacksmith families between the entries for Sarah Derry and William Richards. At (census) house no. 9 were William Wilson and family and at 10 Matthew Lamb (and wife). Perhaps the house had been split in two.
75 House owned and occupied by Sarah Derry. Despite the description in the apportionment she is listed as publican of the White Lion in the census!

Fairfield Street (Fair Close in 1841)
91 House occupied by Ann Aikin. She is not in the census, directory or churchyard record. However the name could be Atkin, as in Jane Atkin who held a garden piece on the Banks. An Ann Atkin was in the census for Newgate Street (aged 60) along with James, 25, a tile maker. In the original documents Ann and Jane are listed together with what appears to be a correction to Jane’s surname (see image)
74 House owned by Sarah Derry and occupied by John Roadley, who was a 28 year old cattle dealer with a wife and three children aged 4, 3 and 1. By 1844 he was also in potato delivery and in 1848 he was a coal dealer. In the directory for 1853 he was a cattle dealer living in Mill Hill (Tithby Road).
72 Two tenements owned by John Buck Snr. and occupied by John Manson (not in census) and Henry Wilson (agricultural labourer).
71 House owned by Thomas Beet and occupied by Thomas Ruxby who was an agricultural labourer with three small children and no wife mentioned in the census. 18 year old Martha Vickerstaff lived there as a charwoman.
70 House owned and occupied by Robert Wilson a miller who also owned and occupied (but did not live at) the windmill (55) in what is now School Lane. One might have expected the windmill to have been owned by the Estate, but seemingly it was not.
69 House owned by the executors of Jane Beet. There was no Jane Beet of the right age in the census for Bingham (but see 66). It was occupied by William Brown, carrier.
68 House owned by John Mabbott and occupied by Thomas Clark(e), a bricklayer and his wife with 4 children aged 8, 6, 4 and 1. The history of this house is described on our web site (15 Fairfield Street).
66 House occupied by John Beet, a 40 year old cottager with his wife Jane (34) and two children aged 12 and 9.
65 Windmill (see 70 above). There was a second windmill just to the west owned and operated by Samuel Walker’s executors (333). This appears on the parish map but not the town map.

Kirkhill (Chapel Close in the census, not named on the map)
58 House owned and occupied by Peter Scothern, agricultural labourer
59 House owned by Peter Scothern and occupied by William Morreys (Morris on the census), also an agricultural labourer.
By 1850 these two houses had been demolished to build the Wesleyan School. It might have been unusual for an agricultural labourer to have owned two houses, but the apportionment has it that way!

Newgate Street
62 2 Cottages owned by James Harvey and occupied by Thomas Wilson, agricultural labourer and William Brown. James Harvey lived and worked as a tailor at 1 Market Place.
54 House owned by John Doncaster and occupied by Samuel Scothern, a bricklayer with a wife and 7 children. John Doncaster was a builder, who lived at Providence House (now Long Acre House), so it is possible this was a tied cottage for one of his workmen. It was occupied also at the time of the census by Elizabeth Bowman, who in the tithe apportionment is living at 85 in Long Acre. Quite possibly she was Samuel’s mother-in-law (she was 75). There were seven children, so the house may have been a little overcrowded!
53 House occupied by Anne Wickham, listed in the census as of independent means and as a farmer in the 1832 directory, which would explain all the barns on the map
52 House occupied by Joseph Woodward, a cottager. He died aged 79 in 1860 (see churchyard survey gravestone no. NW118
51 House occupied by John Greenwood, a cottager.
50 Shop tenanted by Thomas Bellamy, a 30 year old cooper who is in the census as living here with his wife, so it may have been a house-cum-workshop. He also had an allotment (garden piece) at 597.
46 House and farm buildings occupied by Thomas Lee. He was a large scale farmer, occupying 200 acres around the parish. The house still stands as number 8 Newgate Street and is described on the web site.
45 Malt Offices occupied by Joseph Pilgrim. William Pilgrim ran the Chesterfield Arms but Joseph does not appear in the census, although John Pilgrim is in the 1832 and 1835 directories as a maltster.
44 House occupied by William Brown, agricultural labourer in Chapel Yard.
43 9 houses owned by the executors of Mrs Goodacre and occupied by John Cheetham ‘and others’. He was a stocking maker and listed as being in Chapel Yard, Newgate Street The census (figure 3) shows 9 families living in Chapel Yard – a total of 46 individuals. Whether Mrs Goodacre had anything to do with the Goodacres who lived at East Cottage in the late 1800s is not known. It might explain why they retired to Bingham.

Figure 3

Surname
Christian Name
Occupation
Brown
William Ag. Lab.
Ragsdale
John Lab.
Newton
William Lab.
Parks
Robert Ag. Lab.
Cheetham
John Stocking m.
Radford
William Ag. Lab.
Gash
Richard Ag. Lab.
Wilford
John Stocking m.
Smith John Ag. Lab.

Moor Lane
42 3 houses owned by the Earl of Chesterfield and occupied by Abigail Burrows and others. She is in the census as a nurse. It is likely that she was in the middle of the three (detached) houses and that on either side were Ann Towers, a dressmaker (nearer Newgate Street corner) and Elizabeth Parnham. We cannot be certain the census was conducted in house order but it is likely.
41 7 tenements owned by John Pacey and occupied by Thomas Gamble, an agricultural labourer and 5 others (one house was vacant). If our assumptions about the other occupants of 42 and 39 are correct, the other tenants here would have been:

Greatton
Thomas
55
Ag. Lab.
Upton
William
50
Stocking m.
Tutbury
Ann
35
Lace Runner
Grey
John
40
Ag. Lab.
Brewster George
25
Ag. Lab.

25 people lived in these tenements, but four cottages held 20 of them! Sheppard(s) also rented a garden here (no 40) from John Pacey.

39 House occupied by Sarah Hind, a lace runner. The census suggests she occupied the middle of three houses and that on one side was Richard Robinson, an agricultural labourer and on the other (north) was William Gilman, the constable. He was listed as Graham, police officer, in 1848. Interestingly, a Robert Gilman (not in the census or directory) occupied the garden piece to the north described as the ‘Old Poorhouse Garden etc.’, presumably the location of the original workhouse in Moor Lane.
101 3 Houses, Yard & Garden occupied by Elizabeth Doncaster, not in the census. She held three small meadows totalling 6 acres and owned a house at 315 rented to Joseph Barnes. She presumably sub-let these houses.
102 House & Bakehouse owned and occupied by Robert Brice. We understand the bakery equipment is still in the cellar of the house. He also had an allotment garden.
100 House occupied by Thomas Richmond, a tailor who also owned and occupied a house and tailor’s workshop in Needham Street (124). He may have sub-let the house here. There was only one Thomas Richmond in the census – which is probably why the Local History Society (LHS) did not allocate a tithe number to him in the 1841 census exercise. He is in the relevant directories as a tailor and draper.
99 House, Yard, Buildings and Orchard occupied by Richard (aged 85 in the census) and Samuel Parr (40, so presumably a son) who were [market] gardeners. Samuel had a wife and four children. Wife Alice was a milliner, dressmaker and straw bonnet maker in the directories, which did not mention the men! The house is now named Close Acre and the site used to extend to include the modern library site. In addition to this ¾ acre site they held 5 acres of meadow and 3 of arable.
97 3 Houses occupied by Francis Clayton and others. Clayton is not in the census so we cannot guess the others!
96 House occupied by William Porter, aged 50, a stocking maker. 11 people lived in the house, seemingly two families of Porters, the second headed by John who was 33. Given that most ages in the 1841 census were rounded John could have been William’s son. They each had a wife and some children – a bit of a crowd!
95 House occupied by Joseph Roadley, a labourer, and his wife.

Market Place
33 Shop (and house) occupied by Elizabeth Brown, described in the census for Market Place as a potter, with four children but no husband at home. She is described in the 1844 and 1848 directories as China Glass & Earthenware dealer. Whether she actually produced pottery is not known.
34 House occupied by William Pacey whose farm buildings were in the closes to the north (35 and 37). It is now Beauvale House on the Market Place. He was a substantial farmer with 260 acres including 40 acres of freehold. He owned Crow Close.
30, 32 Two rows of 17 shops known as the Shambles, a number were butchers’ stalls, amongst them one run by William Horsepool.
31 House/Shop occupied by George Harrison Snr., probably the one listed in the census as a 70 year old barber with Ann (wife or daughter in law?) aged 55 and son John, 20, also a barber.
29 House occupied by John Harrison, away or deceased at the census but with Mary (55) and family including two young agricultural labourers.
28 House, Yard, Buildings & Garden (an Inn) occupied by Henry Crooke, shown as an innkeeper in the census. The directories identify it as the Blue Bell.
24 House (Inn) occupied by Hannah Whitworth, Witworth in the census, shown as an innkeeper and confirmed by the directories as the Kings Arms, later The Crown (replaced by a modern building in 1966).
23 House occupied by Ann Wood. She was the (first) wife of George Oakes, painter and gravestone carver, and our biographical note for them in the graveyard data base suggest Woods and Oates were related:

Ann was George's (NE115) first wife and was 14 years his senior. They lived in the Market Place from at least 1841. He was a painter and decorator and probably occasional monumental mason. Ann was from Oxton and George from Mansfield Woodhouse. They had two children noted in census returns, Mary Ann, born 1842 and Jane, 1844. Only Jane is mentioned in the 1861 census. By 1871 George had remarried.
In 1841 three children named Wood lived with them - Elizabeth (b 1831), William (1833) and John (1836). We do not know if they were related to either (perhaps to Ann) and they were not in the 1851 census. Ann is buried near but not quite adjacent to the Wood family (SE148,149,150,152,153,154), so may have been a daughter of Thomas or Joseph.

The earliest mention of Oakes in directories is 1844 so perhaps Ann occupied the house before they married – there is a strong chance she was daughter of the well known gravestone carver Thomas Wood. Wood carved his wife’s half of their headstone; Oakes did the other half for Thomas. Oakes had presumably worked for Wood, married his daughter and moved in!

Boot Alley
Three houses (figure 5) were noted in the census for Boot Alley. Ann Boswell rented them all.
21 House occupied by Ann Boswell. The number of differently named residents below (census house no 75 in figure 4 below) suggests she also ran a lodging house. Ann also held a garden running alongside the eastern side of Fair Close and an allotment in the group on Nottingham Road. These may have provided food for the lodging house.
22 2 Houses (74 and 76 in the census) occupied by Ann Boswell, probably sub-let to the occupants listed in the census:

Figure 4

Census House No
Occ
Surname
Christian Name
Age
Occupation
74
1
Towers William
60
Stocking m.
74
2
Towers William
20
Stocking m.
74
3
Towers Elizabeth
15
 
74
4
Riddall Eliza
13
Lace runner
74
5
Roberts William
4
 
75
1
Boswell Ann
50
Laundress
75
2
Wayte Catherine
30
Laundress
75
3
Wayte Hannah
12
 
75
4
Whitworth George
40
Joiner
75
5
Brotherton Henry
30
Stonemason
75
6
Brotherton Margaret
20
 
76
1
Harrison George
40
Ag. Lab.
76
2
Harrison Sarah
35
 
76
3
Harrison Elizabeth
13
 
76
4
Harrison Mary
9
 
76
5
Harrison Jane
7
 
76
6
Harrison Eliza
5
 
76
7
Harrison Thomas
2
 

Market Place
18, 19 Houses occupied by John Barratt, aged 85, of independent means with his grandson as a 15 year old cottager. They are the present ‘Manor House’. Although the apportionment notes only one property at 18 the tithe map clearly shows it split in to three. These could have accommodated Joseph Richmond and Robert Grant whose households are shown in the census between Wood (21) and Barratt (18/19).
17 House occupied by Edward Clifton, 67, (with wife Elizabeth, 67), in the census as a schoolmaster, teaching at the workhouse according to the directory of 1848. The directory of 1822 had Edward Clifton as a linen draper in the Market Place with Harriet a dressmaker. These two could have been the schoolteacher’s father and mother/sister.
16 House occupied by Charles Doncaster, Grocer whose business grew and survived as the ‘town shop in the country’ until the 1950s.
175 House/Shop occupied by William Horsepool, butcher. Now the NatWest bank
174 House/Workshop occupied by John Brown, brazier. Now Cranmer House shops.
170 House occupied by Robert Brewster, of independent means.
169 House occupied by Ann Foster, aged 50, of independent means. She was a tenant of the Chesterfield Estate although she owned houses in Union Street herself – see 153.
168 House/shop and Warehouse occupied by Edward Buck, druggist.
167 House/Shop [and probably] Workshop occupied by Isaac Newton a shoe maker – although the apportionment mentions only a house, the census and directories strongly imply his business was here too. There are entries in the census listing two families living in Newton’s Yard, which must have been behind.
166 House/Shop occupied by John Oliver. He was not present at the census (possibly he had died) but Ann, aged 60, is listed as a grocer. Although the apportionment mentions only a house, he is in the earlier directories as a grocer and tea dealer in the Market Place.
165 12 tenements owned by James White and occupied by William Brown and others. William is not in the census but an entry in the appropriate place in the list is for Samuel Brown, 55, and family; he and his 15 year old son George were watchmakers. George is in the directory for 1853 as a watchmaker in the Market Place. Immediately before the Browns in the census list was Richard Pilgrim, publican. Old photographs of this part of the Market Place show a public house called The Plough and Harrow. The remaining tenants are listed in the census for Market Street (see below)
108 House/shop occupied by James Harvey who ran a tailoring business here. The house still stands as 1 Market Place (currently Birds Bakery). Its history is on our web site.
107 House, Fold & Stock Yards occupied by William Strong, a substantial farmer with 136 acres. He also had houses at 178 and 180 and an orchard at 104.
106 House occupied by Tallents & Burnaby. In 1832 William Edward Tallents was listed as an Attorney and magistrates clerk, so this was probably a solicitors’ office. Further research has shown it to be a branch office of an important Newark firm.

[Thomas Fowke Andrew Burnaby was the third son of John D. Burnaby of Evington, Leicestershire, a Colonel in the Grenadier Guards, and a magistrate. His grandfather was the Venerable Andrew Burnaby, Archdeacon of Leicester.
Burnaby spent all his working life as a solicitor in Newark. He went into partnership with William E. Tallents, the pre-eminent solicitor in Newark, in around 1832. The firm became Tallents, Burnaby and Griffin in around 1846, the senior partner at this time being William's son Godfrey Tallents (1811-1877).
Burnaby held a number of civic posts in Newark. He acted as Town Clerk from 1833 until 1873; Clerk of the Peace and Recorder for the Borough of Newark, 1833-1893; Clerk of the Peace for Nottinghamshire from 1858; and was also the Borough Coroner for Newark. The Dukes of Newcastle were clients of Tallents and Burnaby, and through this connection Burnaby acted as deputy steward of the manor of Newark. He was also chief steward of the manor of Edwinstowe in Nottinghamshire, owned by the Earls Manvers.
He lived at Langford Hall near Newark, and latterly at Brampton Manor in Huntingdonshire, which was inherited by his son Henry Fowke Burnaby (1834-1917)
From https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/mss/online/biographies/biog-pages/thomas-burnaby.phtml]

105 House, Yard, Stables & Garden occupied by William Walker, a seedsman, who owned one arable close and rented four others, a total of 16 acres – one wonders if he grew seed or bought it in. There were four large barns on the property.
103 House occupied by Thomas Voce, a shopkeeper in the 1841 census. In 1844 he was in the directory as a shopkeeper, by 1848 he was a beer retailer.

Market Street
109 House occupied by Mary Gamble, described as a cottager and having just a 3 year old daughter. In 1832 William Gamble had been a farmer in the Market Place and in 1853 Harry Gamble was a dyer in the Market Place. Mary held 6 acres in two meadows. The former Hopkinson’s butcher’s shop is here.
110 House/Shop occupied by James Hardstaff, founder of the grocery shop that became Hardstaff and Brown and later extended into 111 and 112 .
111 House/Shop, School House occupied by William Huckerby, described in the directory for 1844 as an academic and in the census as an auctioneer. His son William was in the census as a clerk – the directory shows him to be superintendent registrar, clerk to the magistrates and to the Union. The directories also show him as a shopkeeper and a druggist.
112 House/Shop occupied by Elizabeth Jones who is the census aged 70 and a druggist. Hannah Jones (35, independent means) was probably her daughter. Joseph Jones, 35, also in the census but at a different house in Market Street was a carrier. The directories show a carrier by that name from 1822 to 1832 but in Market Place – perhaps his father and Elizabeth’s husband. John Jones is in the directories as a druggist and hatter from 1828 to 1830 – maybe her father? He was also a sign painter.
159 House owned by Mrs Gent (not in census or directories) and occupied by Thomas Brice, baker, aged 25. His father Robert had the bakery at the corner of Market Place and Newgate Street (102). Thomas presumably lived in 159 and worked at 102.
160 House and Shop owned and occupied by James Slack, boot and shoe maker. (census; directories 1822 – 1855). His probable son was a cottager in East Street (236). There could have been two houses (one with a shop) in the same holding, as the census shows Ann Slack (aged 80) of independent means living in the next house to James, but possibly the same tithe holding so in practice the same building split into two houses. She was probably his mother.
161 House and Blacksmith's shop occupied by Thomas Brown, blacksmith with two sons as apprentices. A modern restaurant now occupies the site.
162 House/Shop occupied by William Tomkinson, butcher.
163 House owned and occupied by Elizabeth Lomax of independent means. In 1822 William Lomax had been a grocer here and in 1793 Ebenezer Lomax had been a grocer and tallow chandler with no location specified. The newspaper of 1st March 1823 reported a court case alleging William had been robbed by his apprentice, who was actually acquitted.
Lomax’s Yard (part of 163) is mentioned in the census as a separate address without being located to Market Street. The enumerator was number 3 and the house was 42. House tithe numbers 163 and 164 were recorded by the same enumerator and were houses 41 and 43 on his list. Lomax’s yard was occupied by John Footitt, 35, horse breaker, and his family of wife and seven children. This looks very much like it was the three storey farmhouse that is still here and accessed from the yard behind number 7 Market Street.
164 House and Workshop owned and occupied by William Clifton, joiner with two apprentices living in. In the directories he was variously joiner, builder and plumbers merchant. Also named as an occupier is Samuel Brown, watch and clock maker, who is in Market Place in the census. This would fit with the large clock on the wall in a 19th C postcard.
165 12 Tenements (see Market Place) owned by James White. Probably occupied by the individuals in the census for Market Street to whom we have not allocated a tithe number (figure 5), as the occupants of all other properties in Market Street have been associated with individuals in the census:

Figure 5

House
Occ
Surname
Christian Name
Age
Occupation
41
1 Parr Christopher 30 Stocking m.
41
2 Parr Martha 25  
41
3 Parr Eliza 5  
41
4 Parr John    
41
5 Clarke Francis 55 Sawyer
41
6 Thraves John 75 Stocking m.
41r
7 Baxter John 25 Bake
41
8 Straw Peter 15 Wandering musician
41
9 Hamps ?Falting 15 Wandering musician
41
10 Clarke Catherine 25 Wandering musician
41
11 Teake Elizabeth 40 F.S.
46
1 Padgett Benjamin 60 Dealer in cattle
46
2 Padgett Ann 56  
46
3 Padgett Alice . 19 F.S
46
4 Rockley Hannah 10 Lace runner
48
1 Richmond John 50 Tailor
48
2 Richmond Lydia 45  
48
3 Richmond Henry 25 Tailor J.
48
4 Richmond Hellen 20  
48
5 Richmond Jane 15  
48
6 Richmond Ann 15  
48
7 Richmond Harriett 12  
48
8 Richmond Lydia 85 Ind.
48
9 Richmond Mary    
48
10 Doubleday Thomas 15 Tailor ap.
48 11 Kirk William 20 Barber

The stocking makers could well have worked in the framework knitters’ workshop still evident on the site.

Church Street
15 The Rectory occupied by Rev Robert Lowe, family and servants (total of 4 family and ten servants!).
12 House occupied by Thomas Widdowson, 55 and family including 20 year old son also a joiner.
10 House, Malt Offices & Garden owned and occupied by William Pilgrim, landlord of the Chesterfield Arms opposite. The history of the house (7 Church Street) is on our web site. The census shows William as innkeeper with eight servants, presumably working at the inn. They are all listed under the same house (census house no. 80) so it is not clear if Pilgrim actually lived at 10 or at the Inn (179).
9 House owned by William Pilgrim and occupied by Samuel Marriet, not in the census.
8 House owned and occupied by Thomas and Samuel Walker. In census as millers and bakers living in Church Street; their father had owned the mill in Mill Lane [School Lane] see web site for Kirkland House. They are in the relevant directories as bakers and millers of Church Street. Remains of the bake ovens still exist in a building to the rear today. Number 7 was their garden.
6 2 houses, yard, buildings and warehouse owned by James Horsepool, butcher. One house was occupied by him and the other (now 15 Church Street) by Mrs Baxter. The house history for 19 Church Street is on the web site. It is possible he used the premises as a shop after redevelopment in the 1850/60s. There was a slaughterhouse to the rear. He held the associated land to the north (property number 5) as a ‘homestead’. Mrs Baxter was widow of George Baxter and ran a grocery shop here.
3 House occupied by William Hemstock, no occupations given for him or his 35 year old son, but in directories as millers and bakers. He also had the mill on Tithby Road.
189 House occupied by John Foster, not in census
180 House, Shop & Garden occupied by William Strong. John Strong is listed in the census and in directories as postmaster and schoolmaster in Church Street. One of the buildings shown could have been the schoolroom.
179 Chesterfield Arms, Yard & Garden, occupied by William Pilgrim – see 10 above.
176 House/Shop occupied by Mary Gelsthorpe. In the census she is Mary Bailey, draper, with [presumably younger sister] Jane Gelsthorpe living in the house. The directories show Mrs Mary Gelsthorpe, no occupation in 1844 and 1853. The following entries from the churchyard data base are relevant:

(SW001)Mary [Bailey] is recorded in the 1841 census as a draper in Church Street; her husband John (SW002) is not listed and must have been away that night. She seemed to have her younger sister in employment as her draper's assistant. In 1851 John Bailey aged 54 is recorded as a draper in Church Street, presumably her husband. Her mother, Mary Gelsthorpe lived with John after Mary's death. Jane Rayson (SW116) and Mary Ellen Gelsthorpe (SW115) were her sisters.
(SW115) Mary Ellen lived with her widowed mother Mary in the Market Place in 1861, aged 41. In 1871 she lived with the Raysons in Church Street, after they had moved from Chesterfield Street (now Station Street). Mary Ellen was Jane Rayson's sister (SW116 - 3 years her senior) which presumably explains why she is buried next to her. Her other sister was Mary Bailey, SW001.

Church Lane
2 3 houses occupied by Mary Derry and others. The three cottages were derelict for much of the 1900s and then restored n the 1970s to a single cottage, number 1 Church Lane. Seventeen people lived there – see figure 6!

Figure 6

House
Surname
Christian Name
Age
Occupation
90
Wilford Valentine
45
Stocking m.
90
Wilford Elizabeth
20
Housekeeper
90
Wilford James
15
Ag. Lab.
90
Wilford Richard
13
Stocking m.
90
Wilford Abijah
11
 
90
Wilford John
9
 
90
Wilford Lydia
7
 
91
Horsepoole Rupert
35
Ag. Lab.
91
Horsepoole Sarah
35
 
91
Horsepoole Elizabeth
15
 
91
Horsepoole Hannah
12
 
91
Horsepoole George
10
 
91
Horsepoole Sarah
7
 
92
Derry Sarah
24
Needleworker
92
Derry Fanny
2
 
92
Skellington Ann
20
Lace runner
92 Skellington Fanny
 

Cherry Street
188 6 tenements occupied (sub let) by George Harrison Snr. Clearly these were demolished to make way for the three Victorian cottages there now. George was the barber in the Market Place.
There are nine households we could not assign to the remaining houses in Cherry Street, so these six of them were presumably living in these tenements (figure 7).

Figure 7

House
Surname
Christian Name
Age
Occupation
93
Kent Edward
75
Pensioner
94 .
Hotter Robert
50
Ag. Lab
95
Greathead Mary
55
(widow)
96
Parr Charles
30
Ag. Lab.
98
Smith Richard
45
Stocking m.
99
Wright Thomas
40
Joiner
100
Sumner Richard
35
Fishmonger
101
Wilford Thomas
30
Stocking m.
102 Rockley Thomas
45
Ag. Lab.

186 House occupied by William Widnall Snr., 85, of independent means living with his son who was a gardener.
184 House occupied by Thomas Gilbert, a shoemaker probably not self-employed as does not appear in directories.
183 House and Orchard occupied by William Hitchcock, stocking maker with wife and two daughters both of whom were seamers. In 1832 he was a bobbin net maker, in 1864/5 a framework knitter and in 1869 a fruiterer, an indication of the need for alternative employment as framework knitting declined. His descendants were boot makers (Bedford Skinner Hitchcock) and watchmakers (Edwin). See web site for 1 Market Place and 4-6 Station Street.
182 House occupied by Mary Hough, not in the census. There are Houghs in the graveyard data base. She also had a garden piece at the west end of The Banks (323).
181 House/Workshop occupied by John Huskinson Snr. The census shows John Huskinson aged 50 (presumably Jnr.) and family including son George, as stocking makers. Later directories show George as a letter carrier – presumably when framework knitting was declining.

East Street
193 House occupied by Eleanor Wood, in census as Hellen and living with her son William, 35, bricklayer and his children. Address used was Chancel Yard although this is not in the yard area (213).
198 House occupied by John Robinson (aged 45), a stocking maker. Mother, Mary (aged 85) was head of household so the John in the apportionment was probably his father.
199 House occupied by Sarah Hill, aged 50, hosier, and William Lawson. Her address in census is Chancel Row – see below. He was a brick maker living on Grantham Road at the time of the census.
213 11 Houses owned by Thomas Emmison who also owned the 11 gardens behind, of which each tenant had one. The apportionment lists these garden tenants and notes in the occupation of the houses column ‘common to [the gardens]’. The Local History Society (and we have followed) identified 7 of the tenants in the census who occupied particular gardens – it says nothing about which house! Only five families in the census could not be located through the apportionment, so four must be the missing ones for Chancel Yard, and have been numbered accordingly in the census table. Three of ten were in East Street according to the census. James Towers – the highest census house number – is assumed to be somewhere else in East Street.
The census enumerator listed one of the houses as East Street not Chancel Yard (Samuel Richards) and included two that were not in the yard –193, 199.
The most likely list of families (70 individuals) of Chancel Row is shown in figure 7:

Figure 7

TMap Loc
House
Address
Occ
Surname
Christian Name
Occupation
203
107 Chancel Row
1
Scothern Philip Sawyer
213
108 Chancel Row
1
Morley John Stocking m.
202 .
109 Chancel Row
1
Scothern James Shoe m
208
110 Chancel Row
1
Spouge Thomas Ag. Lab.
213
112 Chancel Row
1
Hill Thomas Licenced Hawker
213
113 Chancel Row
1
Gilman Hannah Ind.
205
114 Chancel Row
1
Fenn Thomas Ag. Lab.
204
115 Chancel Row
1
Sills Richard Carrier
209
116 East Street
1
Richards Samuel Stocking m.
213
117 East Street
1
Richmond Edmund Tailor
210 118 East Street
1
Welbourn Thomas Ag. Lab.

The ones in red were not listed as having gardens. The three with East Street addresses in the census probably occupied the three houses that fronted onto the street and may have opened onto the street not the yard.
214 House [and workshop] occupied by Samuel Wilson, who also occupied the close to the north as his homestead. He was a wheelwright. He is in the directories as East Street so might have had his workshop here too, but see 223. He had two other meadows, total holding 6 acres.
218 House occupied by Thomas Roworth, an agricultural labourer.
219 House occupied by John Walker, a blacksmith. He is in the directories as East Street so probably had his business premises here.
221 House occupied by William Fuller, a stocking maker and several children also stocking makers. Possibly he had a workshop here.
222 House occupied by William Wilson, who also had a house at 325, the corner of The Banks and Tithby Road. Various directory entries for Wilsons show them to be a family of blacksmiths operating on The Banks or Langar Lane, which would fit. By the time of the census he was recorded as living on the Banks not East Street.
223 Two houses, Stack yard & Garden occupied by William Wright, farmer with 112 acres around the parish. This became East Grove Farm and is now the site of modern sheltered housing. We do not know who occupied the second house.
236 House occupied by James Slack Jnr., a cottager, who held 17 acres including three meadows.
237 House, Blacksmith's shop & Orchard occupied by John Stafford, a printer. He was not present for the census and his wife was entered as a cottager. He was in the 1851 census. He was in directories as a printing press manufacturer, which might explain the apportionment description of blacksmith’s shop. The old house, with modern additions is 8-10 East Street. Also in the census, at an adjacent house – possibly part of this one – were Elizabeth (85), Ann and Hannah Stafford, women of independent means.

Long Acre (East)
238 House occupied by Richard Wall, a cottager. His daughter was a bonnet maker.
234 House occupied by William Felton, farmer of 33 acres spread over seven fields to the east of the parish on what is now Brocker Farm and Holme Farm.
233.1 House occupied by Robert Guy, agricultural labourer.
233 House and Orchard occupied by Robert Green, 65, cottager. This is Donkey Green’s Cottage, so called because one of the later Greens used to transport his produce around the town on a donkey cart. He held seven acres around his cottage. Details of the cottage are elsewhere.
516 House, Fold, Orchard and Buildings occupied by Executors of Samuel Walker. He had held 103 acres, mostly in one consolidated piece south of Grantham Road. The homestead ran south from Long Acre East with a driveway onto Grantham Road giving direct access to his main holding across the road.
254 House owned and occupied by Thomas Gilman, cottager with under half an acre whose son was a butcher presumably employed by one of the shops.
252 House occupied by William Green, 40, agricultural labourer but with an acre of ground. He was probably son of Robert at 223 and working with/for him.
250 House and Orchard occupied by Samuel Swanwick, cottage with two separate fields (one at Brocker the other on Nottingham Road) totalling nearly 10 acres. His son was a blacksmith’s apprentice.
249 House owned and occupied by John Crooke, a butcher. The house is now Holme Lodge. In addition to the homestead behind the house he had two small fields, one on the north east side of the level crossing on Chapel Lane and the triangular piece at the top of Tithby Hill. Before 1841 directories have him as a butcher in the Market Place, from 1844 they have him in Long Acre. It is difficult to imagine there being a butcher’s shop so far out of the town centre – perhaps he was another occupant of “The Shambles” in the Market Place. The house later must have been bought by the Chesterfield Estate as the deeds show in 1925 the estate passed to the Crown in lieu of estate duty following the death of the fifth Earl of Carnarvon in 1923. The Crown Estate sold it in1951. It had been home to the estate land agent.
246 House and Orchard occupied by William Jackson, 65, carrier, and son/daughter-in-law and their children. Interestingly this was Richard Devoral’s holding in 1776, who was also a carrier but his house was in East Street not here. Perhaps there was some sort of family tie.
245 House occupied by John Ward, a licensed hawker (i.e. selling merchandise on the street or from door to door). A George Ward was a manservant at the rectory who at 19 years old would have been the oldest of a line of children still with John (aged 15 downwards).
241/2 House, Fold Yard, Building & Garden occupied by Arthur Scott, farmer with 27 acres.
239 House in occupation of Thomas Randall, 75, agricultural labourer living with his son, 30, also an agricultural labourer.
240 House and Workshop in occupation of Thomas Hart Jnr., wheelwright. Harts were wheelwrights here, expanding onto the land of 239, throughout the century.

Long Acre (central)
196 House, Fold & Stock Yards occupied by Thomas Foster (hence Foster’s Lane alongside). He was a farmer with 66 acres in a single block of seven fields in north Starnhill, about ¾ mile from his homestead, which included plot 197 and extended the whole length of Foster’s Lane.
195 House, Stack & Fold Yards & Garden occupied by William Chettle, farmer with 159 acres mainly in a block west of Thomas Foster’s with some detached. The house is now Porchester Farmhouse, clearly re-fronted with mid Victorian brick but with much narrow brickwork at the side and rear. There were two William Chettles who were not distinguished by Jnr. and Snr. ascriptions. They were aged 70 and 40 respectively and almost certainly father and son. The tithe apportionment notes only one William as having a house but with two homesteads on the south side of Long Acre - 265 and 266 (part of Warner’s Paddock). The census has them as living at next door houses – it is possible they shared the large farmhouse as two residences. Thus we have allocated both the same tithe number in the census data base. Between them they held 159 acres.
192 House occupied by William Wilford, 60, stocking maker with wife and a 30 year old daughter who was a lace runner.
191 House, Blacksmith's Shop & Garden occupied by John Stubbs Snr., blacksmith. He was clearly running a family business with his 20 year old son already a blacksmith journeyman and his other sons, 15 and 10, were apprentices.
187 House occupied by Charles Kelham, aged 50 of independent means; his son was a blacksmith’s apprentice, possibly to Stubbs next door!
(186 is in Cherry Street)
(184 is in Cherry Street)
185 House/Shop occupied by Charles White, grocer, tea dealer and tobacconist. This is now Regency House; the current shop extension looks later than 1841 although the tithe map seems to show it (or an earlier version). It may have been preceded by a barn which would have been demolished to provide storage for the shop which occupied front room on the corner with Cherry Street. A photograph of 1896 shows the extension but without the shop window which was inserted in the 1990s. His widow was still there in the census of 1901. The photo also shows properties 178 next door and the cottages opposite (284).
178 House, Yards, Garden & Homestead occupied by Samuel White, 75 of independent means with his son Robert, 45, farmer, and family.
177 House, Fold & Stock Yards occupied by William Strong who in the census is a farmer in the Market Place. In the apportionment he also held 107 (Market Place) and 180 (post office run by his father John), so he may have sub let this one. He held 133 acres in the parish.
173 House occupied by George Skinner, farmer with 120 acres.
172 House occupied by Thomas Skellington, in census as Skillington, blacksmith. A Skellington had been a blacksmith here in 1776 too but by 1848 had become a coal dealer. Thomas also rented a couple of closes as had his forebears in 1776. The census has Joseph Skillington, an agricultural labourer living next door – maybe this is a semi detached house?
171 House occupied by Thomas Hart, cottager who had 4 acres of freehold arable land where Harvest Close is now.
(162 is in Market Street)
(161 is in Market Street)
302 Three Tenements occupied by Ann Geeson, 45, Charwoman, and others. She is in the census for Long Acre and probably therefore lived in the house fronting onto this, the others are in the Fisher Lane census. The present building – a late 19th century cottage (offices) - is a later construction.
300 Two Tenements owned by John Innocent (a farmer of Whatton – see national archives record occupied by Richard Hewitt, schoolmaster, and William Nowell, plumber. Both are noted on the apportionment table. Now Falcon House and number 32 Long Acre, behind it
299 Two Houses owned by Richard Doncaster, aged 80 of independent means, one occupied by him, the other by William Draper, stocking maker aged 20. One of these was Tealby House (probably Doncaster’s) and the other possibly Bradshaw’s Cottages. Draper may be the same who had become a letter carrier in Union Street by 1865, perhaps an indicator of the decline of framework knitting.
298 House, Shop, part of Yard & Garden occupied by Mary Dent, 70, independent. In 1793 John Dent had been a weaver, so it is logical to suppose this had been the location of his weaving shed. The house is now Pinchpenny Cottage.
297 House occupied by Richard Doncaster, aged 80 of independent means.
311 House owned and occupied by John Doncaster, builder, known then as Providence House and now as Long Acre House. Its original entrance was off Long Acre between Falcon and Tealby Houses. John Doncaster donated the land for the temperance chapel that stands near the entrance to his house.
288 House occupied by John Tinkler, Innkeeper, shown in directories before and after 1841 as innkeeper of the Marquis of Granby.
287 Four Tenements owned by Samuel Brewster and occupied by Elizabeth Becket (not in census) and others. The census suggests two families here, Martha Nowell (washerwoman) and John Sentence, a cooper.
285 Tenement occupied by William Hutchinson who also held the close to the south (286) described as a homestead (pasture). He was aged 65, of independent means and lived with his son, Ebenezer and daughter Jane. Ebenezer became a veterinary surgeon and lived at Pinchpenny Cottage in the mid 19th century (1851, 1861). William was related to the Hutchinsons of Starnhill – possibly John Hutchinson’s father. In the photograph showing 284, 285 is probably the house with the higher roof line in the centre left.
284 Tenement occupied by John Derry, agricultural labourer, who also rented garden piece number 280 (figure 8). We know from the OS map that these houses survived until at least 1910. They are pictured on the left of this photograph from 1896. Although the apportionment indicates only one property here, the photograph suggests there were four.
It is clear that some of the gardens to the south were let to individuals we can identify in other houses and some are likely candidates from the census for this house, but there are inconsistencies. Johnson, White and Hitchcock clearly rented the three gardens not attached to the tenements. Figure 8 lists the likely additional occupants of the tenements as:

John Goodwin, an agricultural labourer in census.
Robert Holt also rented the blacksmith’s shop at 283 but is in the as an agricultural labourer.
Samuel Parr, an agricultural labourer in the census.

Figure 8

Property number (garden)
name
census
Likely property
In 284?
276
William Johnson AL, Banks St 274 – opposite this garden
no
277
Charles White Grocer, Long Acre 185 – across road
no
278
William Hitchcock Stock’g m, Cherry St 183 - nearby
no
279
John Goodwin AL, Long Acre 279 garden
yes
280
John Derry John Davey, AL Long Acre 284
no
281
John Parr Not in census but other Parrs are in Long Acre yes  
282 Robert Holt Robert Hall, AL, Long Acre 287
Yes

268 House, Homestead, Fold yard & Garden occupied by John Horsepool, farmer.
263 House and Orchard occupied by Thomas Thraves, stocking maker who probably had his workshop here in the house.
264 The Pinfold, having moved across road since 1776.

Long Acre (West)
145 House/shop owned and occupied by Joseph Oliver, dealer in spirits. Prior to 1844 he had been a tanner and bobbin net maker as well as dealing in spirits. The house eventually became the Vaults Hotel and latterly the post office (closed in 2008).
144 House occupied by Benjamin Watson, 76 year old agricultural labourer with wife aged 69 and two unmarried daughters who were laundresses.
147 House/shop owned and occupied by James Mann, who also owned 303 [Norton Cottage] in Fisher Lane. He was a tailor. He is in the census as living in Long Acre.
127 2 Tenements & Ranter's Chapel owned by John Hodgkin (not in census) and occupied by William Castledine, 24, agricultural labourer and another. The second tenant is named as Richard Smith. Ann Smith, shopkeeper, is the only unallocated name from the Long Acre census around here.
128 House, Fold yard & Garden occupied by John Welch, a plumber and glazier.
129 House, Orchard & Garden occupied by George Baxter [market] gardener
(91 is in Fairfield Street)
131 House owned and occupied by Diana Horsepool, 55 of independent means. This property must have been bought by the Chesterfield Estate later as in 1925 it was sold by the Crown Estate.
130 Four Houses owned by William Stokes and occupied by four families.

House 1
John Leighton, aged 40, a ‘Collector of Rags’
Rachel, aged 40, his wife
Eliza, 20; Maria, 15; Ann, 9.
House 2
John Stone, aged 25, bricklayer
Elizabeth, 25, his wife
John, 5; Thomas, 2.
House 3
Elizabeth Pepper, 25, Lace Runner
Elizabeth (daughter?) aged 8, Ann aged 3 and Thomas aged 1.
(no male is recorded, so either she was unmarried, a widow or he was away on census night!
House 4 William Porter, 30, gardener
Rebecca, aged 35, his wife
William, 3; a baby girl aged 3 months

The property is now 4 Long Acre and the house history is on the web site.
135 House & Orchard occupied by Mary Horsepool, 65 year old cottager with son James, 40, a butcher, and his family.
136 House, Fold Yard etc occupied by William Pilgrim, the landlord of the Chesterfield Arms who clearly did not live here. May have been occupied by the Sills, an agricultural labourer with a large household of children and others and could have worked for Pilgrim. It fits the census list!
140 House [and workshop] occupied by George Skinner, cooper. Not present for census but his wife is in as a cooper aged 40 (and a widow in 1851). Also in the census is George Skinner aged 75, cottager with wife Elizabeth and George Skinner, aged 20, manservant! The last three made up a separate household next door. It is just possible the last mentioned George was the grandson of the cottager and son of the (missing) cooper.
141 Wheat Sheaf Inn & Yard owned by Mary Watkinson (not in census) and occupied by William Tomlinson who was the publican.

The Banks (east)
261 House occupied by William Case, an agricultural labourer who also held two detached garden pieces.
262 House occupied by William Spencer, joiner, living with son and family. Is in directory as a cottager. He also held one detached garden piece.
269.1 Shop occupied by John Nowell, stocking maker. As this is described as a shop in the apportionment it must be his workshop, but the census has him here thus implying he also lived here. He was single and aged 60.
273 House and Workshop occupied by Adam Nowell, wheelwright.
274 House occupied by William Johnson, agricultural labourer who appears also to have been running a lodging house as there are two sawyers and a journeyman shoemaker all of different surnames living in the house at the time of the census.
275 House, Shop & Garden occupied by Samuel Cupit, [market] gardener
290 House occupied by Robert Clarke, in census as agricultural labourer (Clark).
295 House, Fold yard & Buildings occupied by John Foster, farmer with 225 acres, successor to (probably grandson of) Widow Foster in 1776. This is Banks House today.
315 House owned by Elizabeth Doncaster and rented by Joseph Barnes, Josiah in the census. No occupation given.
316 House occupied by Richard Rowe, agricultural labourer.

The Banks (west)
317 House occupied by William Rowe, agricultural labourer.
318 House occupied by John Huskinson Jnr., bricklayer.
320 House occupied by Richard Stone, joiner.
321 House occupied by Mary Crampton, charwoman, with her son who was a journeyman baker.
324 House occupied by William Widnall Jnr., [market] gardener
325 House and Workshop occupied by William Wilson, wheelwright. Various directory entries for Wilsons show them to be a family of blacksmiths operating on The Banks or Langar Lane (thus probably on the corner of the two). The censuses imply there might have been three generations – Thomas (85), William (55) and Samuel (35).
325 House occupied by William Wilson. Thomas Wilson, also a wheelwright probably the father is shown in census as living next door to William.
327 House occupied by Mary Ruxby, cottager, with her son, 15. The census address is Banks Street, but it is actually on Tithby Road, still exists as a house with much old brick, beams and small rooms.
634 Mill and Yard at top of Mill Hill (Tithby Road), no house mentioned.

Fisher Lane
314 House owned and occupied by Thomas Clarke, agricultural labourer.
313 House owned and occupied by Richard Rowe, agricultural labourer. This is now Jasmine Cottage
308 Six tenements owned by Thomas Wright and occupied by him and 5 others. Wright was a higgler, defined in www.rmhh.co.uk as “an itinerant peddler. A lot of the Higgler's trade involved barter, rather than money changing hands and the name derives from the resultant haggling”.
307 House owned and occupied by John Hubbard, journeyman tailor.
306 Two cottages owned by James Harvey (tailor at 1 Market Place), occupied by William Smith and Henry Ragsdale, agricultural labourer.
305 Four Tenements owned by John Wilson and occupied by him and others. Wilson was a stonemason. The census suggests these were Williams (bricklayer); Clark (ag lab); Hoe (ag lab); Caunt (ag lab).
303 House owned and occupied by James Mann, tailor who lived on Long Acre so presumably rented this out, we think to John Crofts (ag lab). It is Norton Cottage today.
302 – Three houses, occupied by Ann Geeson, one of which faced Long Acre (see entry). Fisher Lane census has Robert Geeson, shoemaker , living at this end of Fisher Lane (house 55) and Thomas Richardson, agricultural Labourer (house 54). His daughter Ann was a chevener – an embroiderer of fine silk stockings.

Union Street
(113 was a Fold yard, Buildings & Garden occupied by James Hardstaffe)
114 House owned by John Buck occupied by George Gilman, boot and shoe maker with an apprentice and a journeyman living in. It is possible he had his workshop here but it is not mentioned in the apportionment.
115 Six Tenements owned by William Lane (not in census), occupied by Charles Challands and others. In the census for Needham Street Challands was a miller (but in directories for 1830, 1832 and 1835 as a baker and flour dealer in the Market Place.) Is this the baker’s son? Has he moved from Needham Street?
116 House (and Wesleyan Chapel) owned by trustees of chapel and occupied by Thomas Doubleday, a single agricultural labourer. He perhaps also acted as caretaker?
117 House owned by Elizabeth Jones (druggist at 112 on corner of Union Street and Market Street) and occupied by Robert Dickman, not in census but in directories as a tailor in Union Street 1832, 1835 and 1848. In 1853 he was a general dealer and in 1855 a marine store. Later he was an earthenware dealer.
118 Three tenements owned by George Skinner occupied by Widow Jackson and others, not in census.
150 House owned by Henry Wood occupied by John Gilman, not in census.
151 House owned by John Mabbott occupied by George Granger, stocking maker and someone named Ragsdale.
152 Two Tenements owned by John Wright, joiner, one occupied by him and the other probably by John Massey, agricultural labourer and next to him in the census.
153 House owned by Ann Foster (of independent means in Market Place), occupied by Thomas Ratley, grocer and tea dealer in census and directory, so probably his shop was part of the house.
154 House owned by George Skinner Jnr. occupied by John Chettle, not in census. The present owner of Butlers (156) remembers a large school room having been part of the building two doors away from there. The building is large enough to have accommodated the two teachers and seven female pupils recorded in the census next to 155.
155 Two Tenements owned by John Sheppard occupied by Thomas Blezzard, Excise Officer (Blezard in census) and Elizabeth Sampson, not in census but Elizabeth Denman is, next to Blezzards.
156 Tenement owned by John Sheppard occupied by Samuel Pilgrim, baker. This is now ‘Butlers’, the former butchers’ shop.
157 Two houses owned by Joseph Doncaster occupied by James (Joseph in census) Jackson, nail maker, and Panks G Wigginton, surgeon.
158 House owned by James Wigginton and occupied by John Jackson, not in census. From his position in census Dr Luke Smyth was here before he moved to 7 Church Street.

Needham Street
119 Three Tenements owned by George Skinner Jnr. occupied by William Allen, sawyer, and others. Thomas Swift and Samuel Giddings (both ag labs) can be identified as candidates in the census for the other two.
120 House owned by John Wilkinson occupied by William Bass, plumber in census and directory for 1844. Later in partnership as Welch and Bass.
121 House and shop owned and occupied by George Berry, tailor and draper.
122 House owned by Richard Stone occupied by John Mabbott, Lace Agent. Someone called Randall (no forename) also occupied it. This was probably John Randal, in census as stocking maker and immediately after Mabbott in the list.
123 Eight Tenements owned by William Boswell occupied by Thomas Hallam and others. There were two Thomas Hallams in Needham Street! These are probably census houses 156-163.
124 House owned and occupied by Thomas Richmond, tailor.
125 Two Tenements owned by William Wall, cottager, and one occupied by him. The other was occupied by John Towers, who is in East Street in the census. The next name in the list is William’s his son, George, and family who are immediately after William, so he had probably been before or after Towers.
126 Two Tenements owned by William Spencer and occupied by William Gratton (Gretton in census) and Henry Smith, both were agricultural labourers.
(127 and 147 are on Long Acre)
148 Two Tenements owned by Mary Clifton, occupied by Henry Crooke Jnr., agricultural labourer, and Widow Skinner (not in census but listed as second tenant in apportionment).
149 Two Tenements owned by Nathaniel Bailey occupied by William Brown, whitesmith, and George Grey, letter carrier.

Derry Lane area
521 House owned by Widow Ekings occupied by Joseph Holmes, not in census.
524 House owned and occupied by George Goodwin, cottager. Goodwin’s daughter and family are shown in a separate household next to his in the census, so the house may have been split.
525 House owned and occupied by Joseph Clarke, agricultural labourer.
537 Brick kiln & Yard owned by Henry Crooke.

Outlying (not mapped)
449.1 House, Garden, Orchard & Cot, occupied by Richard Brewster, farmer with 118 acres, The Holmes (Holme Farm). Also there were three farm workers who may have lived in the cot(tage).
499.1 House occupied by Robert Harris, farmer with 55 acres, Brocker Farm.
544 House, Garden, Orchard etc occupied by George Harrison Jnr., farmer with 31 acres, on Grantham Road.
856 House occupied by John Hutchinson, farmer with 259 acres, Starnhill
783 House occupied by Thomas Beet, farmer with 67 acres, [Lower] Brackendale Farm
737 Old house, Stable & Yard near Lower Brackendale Farm, occupied by William Widdowson, not in census so perhaps derelict. He was a blacksmith in Cropwell Butler.
724 House, Stock yard, Buildings & Orchard occupied by John Horsepool Jnr., farmer with 76 acres. Not in census. Now the derelict Fosse Farm building on [old] A46.
553 Tollhouse & Garden occupied by Robert Harris (of Brocker). Toll collector William Cook lived there. Not clear why Harris had an interest.
634 Mill House (top of Tithby Road hill) – no house is mentioned in the apportionment but the census shows the Cowdall chimney sweeping family living at Mill House. The enumerator was returning to Bingham from Starnhill (house 76 on his list) and Brackendale (77). Mill House was 78. The apportionment describes it as “Mill and Yard” occupied by William Hemstock, who lived in Church Street. Might this mean it was not a working mill at the time or just that there was room for a family in a house attached but not mentioned in the apportionment?

Missing
Neither the map nor the apportionment makes mention of the Slater and Hill households on the Newark Road, one of which is Buggins Cottage, known to have been the toll cottage at one time. By 1851 it was occupied by Joseph Reddish, Toll Keeper.

Gardens
In 1586 just about every house or cottage had a garden in which to grow vegetables, keep chickens or pigs etc. In 1776 only 8 houses did not have a garden. In 1841 more than 50% of households described as living in a house had no garden – figure 9:

Figure 9

household
With garden Without garden % no garden
total
House
106
76
42%
182
Tenement
27
97
78%
124
total
133
173
57%
306

However, the tithe apportionment lists 168 separate garden pieces plus about 60 that can be counted on the map in the Rev Lowe’s holding along Nottingham road and described as a ‘close of gardens’. Sometime the garden pieces were isolated plots let to someone whose house was at a distance from the garden (e.g. Mary Hough who had just a house in Cherry Street (182) also had a garden piece (323) at the west end of The Banks). The majority (over 100) of these garden pieces were in blocks of what we would now call ‘allotments’. These were all owned by the Chesterfield Estate and consisted of two large blocks (587 – 623 and 654 – 698). Only one or two of the Chesterfield allotments were let to people who were not also tenants of Chesterfield owned houses. Socially aware large land owners were beginning to provide allotments for their tenants. The Rev Lowe let plots in his close of gardens to poorer parishioners, which was characteristic of his ambitions for the poor to save themselves. We have no record of who they were but it is very likely they were mostly occupiers of private tenements where there were no gardens. A nationwide allotment movement was developing rapidly at this time; Bingham was following the trend. One or two privately owned tenement yards had an associated communal garden area for the use of tenants – Spring Gardens and Chancel Row were two examples.

Comparison with 1776

A striking feature of the 1841 town map compared with that of 1776 is the beginnings of expansion beyond the 13th century grid plan, particularly westwards. A major new feature is the density of housing in certain locations. Previously houses had been largely detached and stood in their own close of at least half an acre. By 1841 several developments of closely packed houses had arisen, particularly:

  • along Nottingham Road (79, 82). These were Spring Gardens. Plot 86 was a garden piece shared by the tenants of 79 and 118 (three houses in Union Street) presumably as allotments. All were owned by George Skinner snr and so this is an example of a private landlord providing allotments. Plot 87 was Skinner’s own garden piece. The description of plot 82 merely refers to houses, but one might reasonably assume the rest of the plot was similarly given over to garden pieces for the tenants.
  • Union Street/Needham Street, where quite clearly there was space for only a yard to the rear (as is the case at the present ‘Butlers’)
  • Market Place/Street (developed between 1806 and 1810) corner of Market St/Market Place/ Chapel Yard. Various courtyards of houses are identified on the map.
  • Chancel Row (213)

Many of these and smaller developments (four or five houses) were built as yards – Lomax’s Yard, Newton’s Yard, Stokes Yard (built about 1823) etc., some of which survive today (e.g. along Church Street). Apart from new single houses much of the rest of Bingham remained sparsely developed with houses occupying good sized plots. The large farmhouses were still here although some new farmhouses had been built out of the town.

The apportionment records 9 land parcels with more than five houses built upon them. Only one of these (188 in Cherry Street) was owned by the Chesterfield Estate. The rest were owned by private landlords, so-called speculative builders perhaps. Figure 10 shows the details:

Figure 10

Landowner
surname
Property
number
No of
properties
Plot size
square yards
Sq yds
per house
Pacey
41
7
985.6
140
Skinner
79
14
672
48
Wright
82
12
1075.2
89
Lane
115
6
582.4
97
Boswell
123
8
313.6
39
White
165
12
403.2
33
Earl of Chesterfield
188
6
313.6
52
Emmison
213
11
761.6
69
Wright
308
6
358.4
60

Measurements taken directly off the tithe map show house ground floor areas of 284 sq ft for Spring Gardens, 266 sq ft for (82), 246 sq ft for Needham Street compared with what might be thought of today as moderate sized houses at 327 (now 2 East Street, opposite the church), or 532 (Falcon House on Long Acre).


Home Page | About Us | Links | Contact Us | Newsletter

Site developed by Ambrow Limited | Published by the Bingham Heritage Trails Association | All content is © BHTA
for site credits click here

Back to
top of page