Search

HISTORY OF BINGHAM

Imports from the Continent

Please click an area on the map:

Spain South Gaul Central Gaul East Gaul Argonne

Argonne

Argonne red ware imported from near Rheims in the late 3rd to mid 4th century. This sherd comes from a bowl decorated with a distinctive roller stamped geometric patterns. The roller would have been engraved to make a pattern and used on leather-soft clay before firing.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

Central Gaul

These shiny red bowls are imported from Gaul. This type of bowl with the flange was common in the 2nd century AD. It is not certain which part of Gaul these came from.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

A great number of fine red ware (samian) bowls, dishes, jars and specialised inkpots were imported from Gaul to Margidunum. They were made in all parts of Gaul at different times. This type of pottery is common on military sites in Britain, less common on farmsteads or village sites.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

Fine red slipped samian ware mortarium, a kind of mixing bowl used to pulp and mash fruit and vegetables. This example comes from Central or East Gaul. The potter has made a spout in the shape of a lion’s head to pour off the liquid.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

These sherds are from fine vessels imported from Central Gaul round Lezoux and Martres-de-Veyres in the 1st and early 2nd centuries. The sherds come from elaborate beakers which have semi-liquid clay trailed over to form surface patterns, a bit like decorative icing, before being dipped in liquid clay, called a slip, which fires to a darker colour, brown or orange. The examples to the right have a rough coating of dried clay particles, called rough casting, scattered over their surfaces before being dipped in the coloured slip to create a different effect. The sherds at the top come from shallow bowls with three little feet, called tripod dishes.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

This very fine black small bowl or cup comes from the Central Gaulish workshops around Lezoux, also making the more popular red samian ware. Some of the black slip beakers from Margidunum may also have come from here as well as other kilns around Trier in East Gaul.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

East Gaul

These shiny red bowls are imported from Gaul. This type of bowl with the flange was common in the 2nd century AD. It is not certain which part of Gaul these came from.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

A great number of fine red ware (samian) bowls, dishes, jars and specialised inkpots were imported from Gaul to Margidunum. They were made in all parts of Gaul at different times. This type of pottery is common on military sites in Britain, less common on farmsteads or village sites.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

Fine red slipped samian ware mortarium, a kind of mixing bowl used to pulp and mash fruit and vegetables. This example comes from Central or East Gaul. The potter has made a spout in the shape of a lion’s head to pour off the liquid.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

This is a lovely beaker with a shiny greenish black coating. It was made in Trier, East Gaul, and imported to Margidunum in the late 2nd or mid 3rd century AD. Some examples have motto written in white around the body of the unindented beaker such as “Bibe me” Drink me or “DA MERVM” Give me unwatered wine!
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

These glass fragments are from delicate phials, cups and beakers, probably imported from the Rhineland (East Gaul) or made from imported recycled glass from the Continent.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

South Gaul

These shiny red bowls are imported from Gaul. This type of bowl with the flange was common in the 2nd century AD. It is not certain which part of Gaul these came from.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

A great number of fine red ware (samian) bowls, dishes, jars and specialised inkpots were imported from Gaul to Margidunum. They were made in all parts of Gaul at different times. This type of pottery is common on military sites in Britain, less common on farmsteads or village sites.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth

Spain

This fragment of pottery is part of the rim of an amphora, a huge wine jar, from southern Spain. These are very common in Britain from the 1st to 3rd centuries but are not very common at Margidunum.
Nottingham University Museum Photo: Robin Aldworth


Home Page | About Us | Links | Contact Us | Newsletter

Site developed by Ambrow Limited | Published by the Bingham Heritage Trails Association | All content is © BHTA
for site credits click here

Back to
top of page